Why is bowel screening important?

If bowel cancer is detected at an early stage, before symptoms appear, it’s easier to treat and there’s a better chance of surviving it.

To detect cases of bowel cancer sooner, the NHS offers two types of bowel cancer screening to adults registered with a GP in England:

 

Faecal occult blood test

All men and women aged 60-74 are invited to carry out a faecal occult blood (FOB) test. Every two years, they’re sent a home test kit, which is used to collect a stool sample. If you’re 75 or over, you can ask for this test by calling the freephone helpline on 0800 707 60 60.
An additional one-off test called bowel scope screening is gradually being introduced in England. This is offered to men and women at the age of 55. It involves a doctor or nurse using a thin, flexible instrument to look inside the lower part of the bowel.

Taking part in bowel cancer screening reduces your chances of dying from bowel cancer, and removing polyps in bowel scope screening can prevent cancer. However, all screening involves a balance of potential harms, as well as benefits. It’s up to you to decide if you want to have it.

 

To help you decide, read on to learn about what the two tests involve, what the different possible results mean, and the potential risks for you to weigh up.

For more information on Bowel screening visit NHS Choice’s page by clicking here.